Issue 1. Q3 2010

1st Issue of the Journal

Syntactic and Vocabulary Development in Children: An Investigation of Mother-Child Discourse

Sep 28 2007

Adewole A. Alagbe
Department of English, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria.

There is no doubt that parents and children start communicating well before the latter can meaningfully use language. It is established that the early stage of communication exchanges are full of gestural language and these are usually initiated by the adults from very early on. The development of language has been reported to be fast. It has been observed that during acquisition, children progress from sounds (babbling) to their first real words sometimes before age one, depending on the rate of language growth of the individual child. It is based on this fact that this paper sets out to investigate the syntactic and vocabulary development in childhood. This paper hopes to do this by appraising the word classes that dominate the comprehension and production words of a child. The paper also critically looks at how the earliest words are understood and those produced by a child are related. List of words comprehended and produced by a child would be compared. The results our paper hopes to prove that the level of acquisition for comprehension is higher than that of production, which clearly shows that comprehension precedes production in terms of language development. Based on the word-class analysis, it shows that action words are central to vocabulary development even though they are expressed in different ways during comprehension. It is observed that action words are used by a child to initiate actions in production while non-action words accompany a child's actions.

The Role Of Diplomacy, Empathy And Cross -Cultural Communication In The Promotion Of International Tourism

Sep 28 2007

Christy Best, Ph.D.
Department of Theatre and Communication Arts, University of Jos, Jos, Nigeria.

Tourism has become a growth industry in the twenty-first century. This view is attributable in part to a change in public attitudes in recent years, with an increasing emphasis on leisure and the enjoyment of life. In addition, tourism will also contribute to regional development and international understanding.

The Television Presenter and Star Syndrome

Sep 28 2007

Sarah Lwahas
Department of Theatre and Communication Arts, University of Jos, Jos, Nigeria.

The Television presenter is in a unique and relevant position in any broadcast medium. As a TV personality, he stands in the gap in the communication process, interpreting messages which engage the audience from start to finish. Owing to his capacity to persuade and influence the decisions of the audience, he enjoys accolades of those who see and hear him everyday. As he remains in the forefront or limelight of each presentation, he is likely to lose track of projecting the program content which is the core and bask in his bloated self image. A detailed discussion is contained in this paper.

Negotiating Identity Through Language: A Juxtaposition of Wole Soyinka’s "The Road" And August Wilson’s "Fences"

Sep 28 2007

Amirikpa Oyigbenu, Ph.D.
Department of English, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria.

Since the first contact between Africa and the West, the condition of Africa has continued to suffer debilitating setback. In almost all spheres of human endeavour, Africa has not fared well at all. The decimation of the African people in Berlin in 1884 saw the breakup of hitherto monolithic ethnic groups into different political territories, while the emergence of the trans-Atlantic slave trade witnessed a wholesale cartel of Africans as cargoes that were ferried to the so-called New World. While in the New World, new cultures and languages developed. Here in Africa, traditional languages were jettisoned with the threat of near extinction because European languages (English, French, German, Portuguese, Spanish, etc) were now imposed on Africans as the languages of administration, scholarship, and commerce. In the field of Literature, the dilemma has been in the choice of appropriate language. Even where the English language is in use, the dialectics remains that of accessibility and acceptability. It is in the light of this dilemma that this paper examines language as a domain for negotiating ethnic identity in the works of two illustrious Africans: Wole Soyinka’s The Road and August Wilson’s (African American) Fences.

A Linguistic Stylistic Analysis of Selected Speeches of Maryam Abacha

Sep 28 2007

Priscilla Queen Kparevzua,
Department of English, University of Jos, Jos, Nigeria.

An attempt is made to analyse some linguistic features in the selected speeches of Maryam Abacha. In doing this we are mindful of the linguistic theories as found in Enkvist (1971, 1978), Turner (1979), Hassan (1964), Darbyshire (1971), Crystal and Davy, (1980), Leech and Short (1981), Herdan (1956), Warburg (1978) and others.
The theory that style is a deviation from the norm (Hughes and Trudgill, 1979; Malla,1974) has been criticized just as the theory of style as the manifestation of the individual (Crystal and Davy, 1980). Other writers like Burke (1954) opine that style is found in good writing only.

The Girinya Dance Theatre: An Aesthetic Evaluation

Sep 28 2007

Jacob Manase Agaku, Ph.D.
Department of Theatre and Communication Arts, University of Jos, Jos, Nigeria.

The technological revolution of the West has gradually reduced communication to a “one-button-touch” system in which people prefer to stay at home and watch television/movies than go out to a theatre to watch a live performance. This is adversely affecting the theatre performance as an immediate, dialogic process.
Against this background, how can the Tse-Mker-Tiv theatre, as a residual event, remain relevant and compete with the ever-changing society of computers, Internet, web site and democratic governance? A residual theatre is not a ‘dead’ theatre but a theatre that has lost its original values and is adopting new ones as the social environment undergoes change. The residual theatre might not be able to favourably compete in the Western scientific sense, but will still have relevance and can continue to contribute to social harmony. This social harmony can be achieved on the level of the aesthetic.